Shane Spence is an Product Visualizer based in West Sussex who helps companies, startups, and individuals design to produce visuals that focus on value and experience. His skills span the gamut of product visualization where he uses KeyShot to bring each idea to life. We found out how he started and why KeyShot is a such an important tool to his product visualization workflow.

Shane Spence Design

Modeling software used: Fusion 360
Website | Instagram | Behance

What sparked your interest in product visualization?
I’ve always loved being creative and making things on the computer. It wasn’t until secondary school that I fell in love with rendering and the idea of being able to transform my ideas from 2D sketches to 3D concepts. This is what inspired me to study industrial design at university.

What has been the highlight or your career?
I would say a big highlight of my career was landing my first client as a Freelance Product Visualizer. This was important to me, as it showed I was able to turn something that started as a hobby into a job, allowing me to enjoy what I do every day.

What is unique about your approach to a project/design?
I place a lot of focus on incorporating subtle details and quirks into my designs that add together to solidify the story I’m trying to tell. I do this by studying the brief and submerging myself in research to extrapolate my ideas. This allows me to generate as many concepts as possible before exploring my favourites.

What is your primary 3D modeling software?
I mainly use Fusion 360 for modelling, but 3D models are often provided to me by clients. I have also started to learn Blender to fill the gaps in my workflow. I think having knowledge in both NURBS Modelling and Polygonal Modelling is helpful as it gives you the most flexibility to realize your concepts without compromising on your vision.

Where in the process do you use KeyShot?
I use KeyShot towards the end of my process. I do the bulk of my work away from the computer, sketching and planning, and then bring concepts I’ve modelled into KeyShot to further develop them. I’ll then go back and forth between KeyShot and my modelling software to make the necessary tweaks until I’ve settled on my final concept.

KeyShot is an important tool for me as it is intuitive and simple to get your basic materials and composition in place.”

What makes KeyShot an important tool to have?
As a lot of my work is for marketing purposes, my renderings must convey a clear emotion, story, or message. KeyShot is an important tool for me as it is intuitive and simple to get your basic materials and composition in place. This allows me to quickly disqualify my weaker ideas and saves time when experimenting with lighting and material set ups. This, along with real-time rendering, enables me to go from import to final render without wasting much time.

What advice would you give to someone interested in doing what you do?
Practice as much as you can. There are loads of great learning content out there for KeyShot, with more and more creators sharing their knowledge every day. I’ve found a lot of motivation by entering render challenges. They’re a great way to hone your skills and the weekly, ready-made briefs allow you to try new things, moving from idea to idea without getting bogged down on one concept.

“Practice as much as you can. There are loads of great learning content out there for KeyShot, with more and more creators sharing their knowledge every day.”

See more at shanespencedesign.co.uk/