Kester Page a multi-disciplinary Industrial Designer who designs user-centric products, services and experiences, approaching projects with a disruptive mindset and visualizing it all using KeyShot. He is also a co-founder of Design Burger, the platform that features influential design from students and professionals. Here we find out what sparked his interest and how he executes his passion for good design.

Kester Page

Modeling software used: Fusion 360
Website | Instagram | Linkedin

What sparked your interest in product/industrial design?
The interest has always been there. So, no one-thing triggered a “that’s what I want to do with my life” moment. Design has always appealed to me as I like creating things. It’s not just the enjoyment of sketching, and the drawing; It’s about watching an idea come to life. I do think, however cliché it is, that if it wasn’t for my inspirational schoolteachers appealing to me, it’s unlikely I would have ultimately gravitated into it. Thankfully I did.

What has been the highlight of your career?
I think highlight is the wrong word for it, but the impact that COVID has had on my career has been the most profound. It made me start thinking about how I could be independent. Now I work from home. And, in doing so, it has enabled me to allocate time to myself and to the things I want to work on. When you’re working on things because you want to – that’s when your work is truly rewarding. It’s meaningful and that’s when you’re most effective. Winning awards for products you have been a part of, and seeing them come to market, that’s also a highlight.

What is unique about your approach to a project/design?
I don’t have a rule a book. Every design brief is different. So, I can’t say I add the same unique thing to the way I design any particular product. It’s because there’s never a ‘one size fits all’ solution to a design problem. And there are many different solutions. There’s a framework and good positions to begin with. Through running Design Burger, I do think that some people are artsy and very aesthetically-minded. Others, on the other hand, are more business focused. I appreciate it all from a holistic perspective.

What is your primary 3D modeling software?
Fusion 360. It’s agile. You don’t want an unwieldy system slowing you down. I also find there are fewer issues and, therefore, fewer things to get frustrated about. Those are obviously things you want to minimise. On top of that, it’s the best value product and the most intuitive. And, obviously, its integration with KeyShot is a bonus.

Where in the process do you use KeyShot?
It really depends on the project. Typically I use it for refined visuals but I also use it early on in the design process as it allows for fast, realistic visualization that can be used to validate design decisions.

With KeyShot, you can quickly produce high quality visuals with excellent pre-sets and there’s minimal set up time.”

What makes KeyShot an important tool to have?
With KeyShot, you can quickly produce high quality visuals with excellent pre-sets and there’s minimal set up time. If you need perfect visuals, it can deliver that as well.

What advice would you give to someone interested in doing what you do?
The final product is the tip of the iceberg. There’s a lot more going on in the background of development. Solving the problem and the thought behind the final products are the bulk of the creative process. If you enjoy that challenge, then that’s fantastic.

“Solving the problem and the thought behind the final products are the bulk of the creative process.”

See more at kesterpage.com/