Igor Sobolevsky

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Igor Sobolevsky

Modeling software used: Maya
Website: artstation.com/artist/igoq

How did you go from Industrial Design to 3D concept art? How did it influence your work?
I still work in the industrial design field, however most of these projects are under NDA. The concept design work is very liberating since I do not have to follow limitations of manufacturing, cost and materials. However I feel it is important for any design to be rooted in reality since this helps the viewer relate to the design. ID training definitely influenced the way I come up with ideas and develop them.

What are some highlights throughout your career?
One of the coolest opportunities was a drone concept I designed for a client in the aerial robotics field. We went through a rather standard development process, from sketches, to rough model, some iterations and then final CAD and renders. Weeks later I received a video of my concept taking flight. As a multi rotor enthusiast, that was one of the coolest experiences I had with a project. Another highlight was writing a tutorial and being a featured designer in 3D Artist Magazine (volume numbers 81 & 86). I have been following this publication for years and this has been a huge honor.

What would you say is unique about your approach to a project?
It is difficult to say, since there are so many great artists with unique techniques. My industrial design training taught to do research when approaching any project. I follow tech blogs, designers and generally keep my eye out for the latest technological developments. A designer needs to have strong grasp of a subject at hand. This, in my opinion informs the design and makes it believable and appealing.

What is your primary 3D modeling software?
Maya is my primary modeling tool. It enables me to make smooth surfaces as well as detailed part. Most importantly, it plays very well with ZBrush and Rhino. I can assemble complex models in Maya using parts made in other software packages.

Where in the process do you use KeyShot?
I start relatively early. Even before the model is finished, I bring in the rough design into KeyShot and set my cameras to orthographic views. I take screenshots to be imported into illustrator and design graphics. This helps me to visualize the final graphics layouts and how they work with the color and texture of the model.

When I started out I was using native render engines on my software, but was never able to achieve that polished look. KeyShot makes this easy and efficient with realistic environments, materials, and texturing tools.”

What makes KeyShot an important tool to have?
Clients love to see a photorealistic renders even before the final product is completed. These images are the basis of a dialogue that leads to the final design. When I started out I was using native render engines on my software, but was never able to achieve that polished look. KeyShot makes this easy and efficient with realistic environments, materials, and texturing tools.

What advice would you give to someone interested in doing what you do?
Stay flexible, ask questions, take criticism and always be open for learning something new. This industry is very dynamic and fast paced, therefore a designer should be able to adapt to the needs of the project. At the end of day your name is attached to the work that you do, so do the best possible work you can.

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