Author Topic: Keyshot import of Maya FBX vs import by material  (Read 4615 times)

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Offline 3.5 Bars

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Keyshot import of Maya FBX vs import by material
« on: February 14, 2015, 12:30:58 am »
I am in the process of trying to understand the different import methods and the benefits of each so I can effectively create a workflow.

This is the situation.

From the many tutorials about Keyshot on the the interwebs, the models that have been brought in from external 3d apps all have different materials assigned so Keyshot can tell the difference between each part so each material can be applied separately.

This I do understand.

However In Maya if you create a group for a example - wheelset  and within that group there are three objects
Tire
Rim
Wheel Nuts

Keyshot seems to be able to read the FBX folder structure, so in essence I can apply a material to the Group ie - Wheelset

OR

I can apply materials to each separate object within the group ie, Tire, Rim, Wheel Nuts.

Since this seems possible, what advantage would there be - in Maya to apply for example 80 different materials to a car then to import into keyshot, If keyshot can already read the FBX folder structure.

Many Thanks


guest84672

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Re: Keyshot import of Maya FBX vs import by material
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2015, 02:45:56 pm »
Why don't you import the native Maya file?

Offline 3.5 Bars

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Re: Keyshot import of Maya FBX vs import by material
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2015, 06:58:22 pm »
Hi thomasteger

Thank you for your reply.

Could you kindly explain what the benefit of this would be ie - importing maya file vs FBX vs obj all with different materials, it has always been a "Monkey see Monkey do" situation and would appreciate a break down.

Many Thanks.

guest84672

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Re: Keyshot import of Maya FBX vs import by material
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2015, 02:27:12 pm »
Every time you go through a neutral file format you are running the risk of losing something. That's why we always recommend to use the native file format when available.