Author Topic: How to Achieve Two-Tone Backgrounds + Shadow Images  (Read 221 times)

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Offline Rollk1

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How to Achieve Two-Tone Backgrounds + Shadow Images
« on: February 05, 2019, 03:51:23 pm »
I'm setting up a scene for product photography and want to achieve 2 things (either together or separately):
1. A two-tone background similar to this https://readcereal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/kenyaportrait4.jpg
Would a backplate be the best bet? If so is there a way to make it scale with the image canvas size? Or would I make a custom backplate from scratch set to the dimensions I need?

2. The ability to cast an image as a shadow similar to this https://ucarecdn.com/88ee9668-eee7-465e-98ea-ae19de7cc9ff/-/preview/mNyYwlUf

Any advice is appreciated, thanks!

Offline designgestalt

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Re: How to Achieve Two-Tone Backgrounds + Shadow Images
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2019, 01:34:38 am »
hello Rollk1,
 as for 1) 
you could create to planes ("add geometrie") one for the floor, one a s a backplate. If you play with the distance in between the floorplate and the backplate you could create that shadowline, that you can see in the attached image.
as for 2)
there are for sure a few ways to create this effect, maybe the quickest one would be like this:
if you create that kind of image in Photoshop (with a feathered / smooth outline) you could add this as a label to the backplate. you need a .png with a transparent background and you might need to play around with the feathering a bit to avoid a harsh transition in between the label and the background.

I would try this for a start!
cheers
designgestalt

Offline RRIS

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Re: How to Achieve Two-Tone Backgrounds + Shadow Images
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2019, 06:41:29 am »
A label for that shadow is something I never considered, that could work quite well :)
I tend to just make a black flat shaded plane with an opacity map to cast shadows, which is more of a hassle, since you need to keep the direction of the lighting in consideration (and you'll need at least one small point light, which you may not want for your product lighting.