Author Topic: Interior shots  (Read 1432 times)

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Offline Renata

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Interior shots
« on: November 22, 2017, 12:12:15 pm »
Hi,
Trying out interiors in keyshot, any pointers to make these shots better/more realistic?

Offline Jslowsky

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Re: Interior shots
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2017, 02:16:24 pm »
In Architecture the range of deep blacks coupled with more than average ambient occlusion will help bring a sense of realism into your work. The blacks can be achieved in post using Curves in Photoshop, and for the ambient occlusion I usually double the layer and tweak it in post (again, Photoshop). I thought your renderings look good to begin with, nice camera choice and composition. For the storefront a couple of tricks will help, one is to render the glass by itself so you can control the specular highlights which is what gives glass the illusion that it is there.  You add the glass back in as a layer in Photoshop. Another is to have something close to the camera that has over-the-top details which influences the scene (such as planters, or a real human walking by in motion), I think for your shot I would change the flooring to a Terrazzo using a pattern. The glass in reality would never touch the ground... it would have a small pony wall to hold it. Here is where I would use the extra layer of AO. And although you have lit it evenly, I would encourage to make the lighting within the showcase more dramatic (look at any great luxury window display for reference). Use the glass technique I mentioned so you barely see the film distortion of the glass, mostly you only see the reflective highlights. As for the closeup on the shoe... use a spot light to illuminate it, allow the pedestal to have more life by changing it to a black granite. Curves need to used for the pedestal but not on the shoes. Use AO appropriately and Bob's your Uncle.

Offline fario

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Re: Interior shots
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2017, 12:52:08 am »
Nice! Bob!

Offline Josh Mings

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Re: Interior shots
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2017, 09:46:20 am »
Off to a great start! You could drop the ambient lighting a smidge to get some more contrast and more dramatic lighting. As it is, the amount of ambient light seems to wash things out a bit. I'd also suggest increasing the tessellation to improve the quality of those curves.

Offline Renata

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Re: Interior shots
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2017, 06:45:49 am »
Thanks guys , great advice.. will work on it. much appreciated  :)

In Architecture the range of deep blacks coupled with more than average ambient occlusion will help bring a sense of realism into your work. The blacks can be achieved in post using Curves in Photoshop, and for the ambient occlusion I usually double the layer and tweak it in post (again, Photoshop). I thought your renderings look good to begin with, nice camera choice and composition. For the storefront a couple of tricks will help, one is to render the glass by itself so you can control the specular highlights which is what gives glass the illusion that it is there.  You add the glass back in as a layer in Photoshop. Another is to have something close to the camera that has over-the-top details which influences the scene (such as planters, or a real human walking by in motion), I think for your shot I would change the flooring to a Terrazzo using a pattern. The glass in reality would never touch the ground... it would have a small pony wall to hold it. Here is where I would use the extra layer of AO. And although you have lit it evenly, I would encourage to make the lighting within the showcase more dramatic (look at any great luxury window display for reference). Use the glass technique I mentioned so you barely see the film distortion of the glass, mostly you only see the reflective highlights. As for the closeup on the shoe... use a spot light to illuminate it, allow the pedestal to have more life by changing it to a black granite. Curves need to used for the pedestal but not on the shoes. Use AO appropriately and Bob's your Uncle.

Thank you will definitely try these out , much appreciated.. :)

Offline Renata

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Re: Interior shots
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2017, 10:27:23 am »
still trying to figure things out but for the mean time is it looking any better?
other than the ugly tiling, do you have anymore pointers i could use?
thanks

Offline Will Gibbons

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Re: Interior shots
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2017, 10:20:36 am »
I think two things could improve this quite a bit.

1. Contrast. It's too mid-toned in my opinion. Try to push for a full-range of darks and lights
2. Sharper reflections. I think the reflections on the hard surfaces look a bit too soft and diffused.

Those two things would bring it to more photo-real I think. Check some shopping mall photos on Google for reference.

All that said, everything else looks quite nice.