Author Topic: How you achieve this Anaglyph effect?  (Read 2089 times)

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Offline valentin_valev

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How you achieve this Anaglyph effect?
« on: July 06, 2017, 07:18:46 am »
Greetings, guys.
Firstly - I'm not sure if this topic is posted in the right section, but I think this effect is a render effect/pass or something like this.
I've noticed several realistic keyshot renders and all of them have the same light dispersion effect. Looks like anaglyph 3d effect or something.
( I am not sure if it is 100% light dispersion, because this effect appears when the light goes through a glass material and the white light is separated into its component colors - red, orange, yellow, green, blue and violet. )
If you see the car render, you can notice right next to left headlight there is a thin red line.
On the next image you can see the same effect but this time the colors are different.

Is that a post-production effect, anaglyph 3d effect or some kind of global illumination which caused the light the bounce up from the surface and that cause some kind of glow which we see as a tint or what? I am trying to figure this out.

Thanks :)

Offline evilmaul

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Re: How you achieve this Anaglyph effect?
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2017, 07:36:01 am »
hi,

the effect you refer to is called chromatic aberration and shortly it s caused by defects of the camera lenses.
more info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatic_aberration

in a very simple way, once u got your render, in photoshop you can just select the separate rgb channels and move then a pixel or 2 (or whatever numbber according to how strong you want the effect) . Otherwise if you dont want to bother messing up with the channels yourself there is the good old Lens correction filter :)



Offline Will Gibbons

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Re: How you achieve this Anaglyph effect?
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2017, 07:46:13 am »
And in KeyShot 7, Chromatic Abberation is built into the image tab.

:)

Offline valentin_valev

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Re: How you achieve this Anaglyph effect?
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2017, 07:48:22 am »
Thank you evilmaul :) I finally figure out how this effect is called.
So it seems that you can achieve this effect easily in Photoshop, but is there any way you can do this in Keyshot using camera options only, for example. :)

Will Gibbons, thanks for the info :)


Offline DMerz III

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Re: How you achieve this Anaglyph effect?
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2017, 11:25:20 am »
Lens correction filter in Photoshop also has the more advance options for chromatic aberration. Keep in mind, the effect usually is strongest toward the outer diameters of the frame, in the middle, things usually are less affected. I believe the Photoshop filter takes this into account, which doesn't happen if you move the RGB channels individually.

-David Merz